YES, keep running these films/images through Google’s neural network thing. http://t.co/cMW11J6Bd3


OMG the video is so much better! https://t.co/u6uGE7Rpa2


OK, Battlebots is awesome.. But I cannot stand the flat robots that just flip something. Lame. Make some melee.


I will be playing in my brand-new/Patreon @Minecraft world at 10pm EDT, right here: http://t.co/id3HNOuQbL


A quick look at my Minecraft world (it’s brand new!) 10EDT: http://t.co/0mi9MO04vW


Thanks to Gamer Hangout co-host for hanging with me in @Minecraft ….she got killed by a speeding baby zombie. Awesome.


Thanks to Gamer Hangout co-host @EboniCodes for hanging with me in @Minecraft ….she got killed by a speeding baby zombie. Awesome.


My new Minecraft server intro stream!
Posted by [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 7 July 2015, 4:36 am
I just opened my own Minecraft server for my Patreon subscribers. These are the first hours in the game, and Eboni (Gamer Hangout co-host) joins me later on! — Watch live at http://www.twitch.tv/beauhindman


I’m honored AND weirded out! 😉 https://t.co/oNvCjWHhEP


Could The Chronicles of the Spellborn Return http://t.co/BhodjrKxyy via @MMORPGcom


Vacation
Posted by Bwblog | Star Wars: The Old Republic [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 7 July 2015, 11:17 am
Even by Outer Rim standards, the Sarlacc and Loaded cantina was considered the end of the line.


Fallout For Your Pocket: Funko Mystery Minis
Posted by Bethesda Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 7 July 2015, 9:31 am
Funko is back with more Fallout – this time in their Mystery Mini line. These pocket-sized companions will be sold in blind boxes — meaning you won’t know the mysterious stranger (it could be the Mysterious Stranger) until you open the box — will available beginning in September. For more, IGN has a new post […]


Hard Labor
Posted by DDOcast - A DDO Podcast! [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 7 July 2015, 9:02 am

Posted in OurDDOSyndicated

Back at work now and there is too much needed to here to spend time catching up on matters of interest in DDO. I wanted to note that I’ll be soon making major rewrites to The Book of Syncletica. This overhaul will bring the guide to current update information, add at least a couple of builds […]


Media Link

Derek Smart Would Like To Talk About Star Citizen and Crowdsourcing
Posted by Zen Of Design [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 7 July 2015, 12:51 am
Yes, the Derek Smart who spent the 90s promising the moon before discovering that game designs should be small enough that they’re achievable.  Anyway, he’s learned a lot on the way, and that’s helped him forge some opinions on the current state of Star Citizen in the face that a planned FPS module of the game […]


That is not a game!
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 7 July 2015, 5:44 am
Compared to other media, discussing games is more complicated, because there are two very distinctive parts to it: Gameplay and story. For a long time reviews were pretty much limited to discussing gameplay, but with the advances of technology that becomes less and less viable. There are more and more games out there where the gameplay is very simple to the point of being nearly non-existing, but the story is very important, for example the recent "Her Story".

I'm sharing Azuriel's dislike of games that are about blind choices, where you are being told a story and have to make a decision with no hint of what the consequences of that decision are going to be. So I recognize the story value of games like "80 Days" or "Ryan North's To Be Or Not To Be", but find them aggravating to play. In other cases I'm okay with the gameplay, but dislike the story, setting, or the message the game is sending, for example with "Fallout Shelter". So I see gameplay and story as separate issues, but both have to be right for a game to be enjoyable to me.

The trap that I see many people falling into is saying that if for either gameplay or story reasons they don't like a game, "that is not a game!". Well, then what else is it? I can't really understand why Clicker Heroes is one of the top ten played games on Steam, but I wouldn't know what other than "game" I would call it. The whole genre started with satire games like Progressquest and Cow Clicker, and then surprised the satirists by their popularity. An argument can be made that these idle games are "stupid", but I refuse to call them "not a game", because that would require a needlessly complicated definition of what a game is, just so that we could exclude the games we don't like from the definition.
Tobold's Blog



Lets Talk Allies
Posted by MmoQuests.com [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 7 July 2015, 7:00 am
  Over the past few days my alliance (which compromises of myself and three other people) have been in discussions with another alliance along the South Eastern corner of Xanadu. We decided to take...


Accuracy and reverting to the mean
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 9:54 am
Talarian has a very niche post up, discussing accuracy in games. The chance to hit with an attack that is, not whether the things depicted in those games are accurate, which is a completely different can of worms. Talarian points out that if the game is designed around a few, decisive attacks, you are more likely to feel the effect of randomness. If there are many small attacks, missing a few doesn't matter so much, and is felt much less.

I found that interesting because it pretty much describes my main point of contention with 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons. I prefer 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons, whose combat has with some justification been described as "slow". Basically in 4E everybody has a lot of hit points, and you need several good hits to bring an enemy down. In 5E the characters have a lot less hit points, deal more damage, and thus fights are over much quicker. But because of what Talarian describes, the 5E combat is much more likely to produce random results. In 5E it matters less whether the player has good tactics or otherwise made good choices, he can be downed in round one by a critical hit before he even acted. Fast, yes, but for me that speed comes with too much of a price.

I especially hate critical hits in 5E. In 4E a critical hit deals maximum damage. Only at later levels, when you have magical weapons, do you get additional dice to roll. In 5E you get double the dice on a critical even at level 1. So a simple arrow dealing 1d6 damage does 6 damage in 4E, and 2d6 damage in 5E. Which very much opens up the chance of the high attack roll being followed by a high damage roll, for up to 12 points of damage. Which knocks out most level 1 characters.

Of course the early death of a key player can create some good narrative. But it also removes damage potential from the player's side, so makes the combat slower again. From a social point of view it is awkward having a player just sit there, not able to participate, just rolling death saves for the rest of the encounter. Especially if it is due to no fault of his own.

I guess that is a typical example of me putting gameplay over narrative. I would like the outcome of a combat to be determined by tactics, not by chance, even if that makes the game more predictable and less fast.
Tobold's Blog



Accuracy and reverting to the mean
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 9:54 am
Talarian has a very niche post up, discussing accuracy in games. The chance to hit with an attack that is, not whether the things depicted in those games are accurate, which is a completely different can of worms. Talarian points out that if the game is designed around a few, decisive attacks, you are more likely to feel the effect of randomness. If there are many small attacks, missing a few doesn't matter so much, and is felt much less.

I found that interesting because it pretty much describes my main point of contention with 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons. I prefer 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons, whose combat has with some justification been described as "slow". Basically in 4E everybody has a lot of hit points, and you need several good hits to bring an enemy down. In 5E the characters have a lot less hit points, deal more damage, and thus fights are over much quicker. But because of what Talarian describes, the 5E combat is much more likely to produce random results. In 5E it matters less whether the player has good tactics or otherwise made good choices, he can be downed in round one by a critical hit before he even acted. Fast, yes, but for me that speed comes with too much of a price.

I especially hate critical hits in 5E. In 4E a critical hit deals maximum damage. Only at later levels, when you have magical weapons, do you get additional dice to roll. In 5E you get double the dice on a critical even at level 1. So a simple arrow dealing 1d6 damage does 6 damage in 4E, and 2d6 damage in 5E. Which very much opens up the chance of the high attack roll being followed by a high damage roll, for up to 12 points of damage. Which knocks out most level 1 characters.

Of course the early death of a key player can create some good narrative. But it also removes damage potential from the player's side, so makes the combat slower again. From a social point of view it is awkward having a player just sit there, not able to participate, just rolling death saves for the rest of the encounter. Especially if it is due to no fault of his own.

I guess that is a typical example of me putting gameplay over narrative. I would like the outcome of a combat to be determined by tactics, not by chance, even if that makes the game more predictable and less fast.
Tobold's Blog



Accuracy and reverting to the mean
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 9:54 am
Talarian has a very niche post up, discussing accuracy in games. The chance to hit with an attack that is, not whether the things depicted in those games are accurate, which is a completely different can of worms. Talarian points out that if the game is designed around a few, decisive attacks, you are more likely to feel the effect of randomness. If there are many small attacks, missing a few doesn't matter so much, and is felt much less.

I found that interesting because it pretty much describes my main point of contention with 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons. I prefer 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons, whose combat has with some justification been described as "slow". Basically in 4E everybody has a lot of hit points, and you need several good hits to bring an enemy down. In 5E the characters have a lot less hit points, deal more damage, and thus fights are over much quicker. But because of what Talarian describes, the 5E combat is much more likely to produce random results. In 5E it matters less whether the player has good tactics or otherwise made good choices, he can be downed in round one by a critical hit before he even acted. Fast, yes, but for me that speed comes with too much of a price.

I especially hate critical hits in 5E. In 4E a critical hit deals maximum damage. Only at later levels, when you have magical weapons, do you get additional dice to roll. In 5E you get double the dice on a critical even at level 1. So a simple arrow dealing 1d6 damage does 6 damage in 4E, and 2d6 damage in 5E. Which very much opens up the chance of the high attack roll being followed by a high damage roll, for up to 12 points of damage. Which knocks out most level 1 characters.

Of course the early death of a key player can create some good narrative. But it also removes damage potential from the player's side, so makes the combat slower again. From a social point of view it is awkward having a player just sit there, not able to participate, just rolling death saves for the rest of the encounter. Especially if it is due to no fault of his own.

I guess that is a typical example of me putting gameplay over narrative. I would like the outcome of a combat to be determined by tactics, not by chance, even if that makes the game more predictable and less fast.
Tobold's Blog



Accuracy and reverting to the mean
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 9:54 am
Talarian has a very niche post up, discussing accuracy in games. The chance to hit with an attack that is, not whether the things depicted in those games are accurate, which is a completely different can of worms. Talarian points out that if the game is designed around a few, decisive attacks, you are more likely to feel the effect of randomness. If there are many small attacks, missing a few doesn't matter so much, and is felt much less.

I found that interesting because it pretty much describes my main point of contention with 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons. I prefer 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons, whose combat has with some justification been described as "slow". Basically in 4E everybody has a lot of hit points, and you need several good hits to bring an enemy down. In 5E the characters have a lot less hit points, deal more damage, and thus fights are over much quicker. But because of what Talarian describes, the 5E combat is much more likely to produce random results. In 5E it matters less whether the player has good tactics or otherwise made good choices, he can be downed in round one by a critical hit before he even acted. Fast, yes, but for me that speed comes with too much of a price.

I especially hate critical hits in 5E. In 4E a critical hit deals maximum damage. Only at later levels, when you have magical weapons, do you get additional dice to roll. In 5E you get double the dice on a critical even at level 1. So a simple arrow dealing 1d6 damage does 6 damage in 4E, and 2d6 damage in 5E. Which very much opens up the chance of the high attack roll being followed by a high damage roll, for up to 12 points of damage. Which knocks out most level 1 characters.

Of course the early death of a key player can create some good narrative. But it also removes damage potential from the player's side, so makes the combat slower again. From a social point of view it is awkward having a player just sit there, not able to participate, just rolling death saves for the rest of the encounter. Especially if it is due to no fault of his own.

I guess that is a typical example of me putting gameplay over narrative. I would like the outcome of a combat to be determined by tactics, not by chance, even if that makes the game more predictable and less fast.
Tobold's Blog



Accuracy and reverting to the mean
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 9:54 am
Talarian has a very niche post up, discussing accuracy in games. The chance to hit with an attack that is, not whether the things depicted in those games are accurate, which is a completely different can of worms. Talarian points out that if the game is designed around a few, decisive attacks, you are more likely to feel the effect of randomness. If there are many small attacks, missing a few doesn't matter so much, and is felt much less.

I found that interesting because it pretty much describes my main point of contention with 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons. I prefer 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons, whose combat has with some justification been described as "slow". Basically in 4E everybody has a lot of hit points, and you need several good hits to bring an enemy down. In 5E the characters have a lot less hit points, deal more damage, and thus fights are over much quicker. But because of what Talarian describes, the 5E combat is much more likely to produce random results. In 5E it matters less whether the player has good tactics or otherwise made good choices, he can be downed in round one by a critical hit before he even acted. Fast, yes, but for me that speed comes with too much of a price.

I especially hate critical hits in 5E. In 4E a critical hit deals maximum damage. Only at later levels, when you have magical weapons, do you get additional dice to roll. In 5E you get double the dice on a critical even at level 1. So a simple arrow dealing 1d6 damage does 6 damage in 4E, and 2d6 damage in 5E. Which very much opens up the chance of the high attack roll being followed by a high damage roll, for up to 12 points of damage. Which knocks out most level 1 characters.

Of course the early death of a key player can create some good narrative. But it also removes damage potential from the player's side, so makes the combat slower again. From a social point of view it is awkward having a player just sit there, not able to participate, just rolling death saves for the rest of the encounter. Especially if it is due to no fault of his own.

I guess that is a typical example of me putting gameplay over narrative. I would like the outcome of a combat to be determined by tactics, not by chance, even if that makes the game more predictable and less fast.
Tobold's Blog



Accuracy and reverting to the mean
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 9:54 am
Talarian has a very niche post up, discussing accuracy in games. The chance to hit with an attack that is, not whether the things depicted in those games are accurate, which is a completely different can of worms. Talarian points out that if the game is designed around a few, decisive attacks, you are more likely to feel the effect of randomness. If there are many small attacks, missing a few doesn't matter so much, and is felt much less.

I found that interesting because it pretty much describes my main point of contention with 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons. I prefer 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons, whose combat has with some justification been described as "slow". Basically in 4E everybody has a lot of hit points, and you need several good hits to bring an enemy down. In 5E the characters have a lot less hit points, deal more damage, and thus fights are over much quicker. But because of what Talarian describes, the 5E combat is much more likely to produce random results. In 5E it matters less whether the player has good tactics or otherwise made good choices, he can be downed in round one by a critical hit before he even acted. Fast, yes, but for me that speed comes with too much of a price.

I especially hate critical hits in 5E. In 4E a critical hit deals maximum damage. Only at later levels, when you have magical weapons, do you get additional dice to roll. In 5E you get double the dice on a critical even at level 1. So a simple arrow dealing 1d6 damage does 6 damage in 4E, and 2d6 damage in 5E. Which very much opens up the chance of the high attack roll being followed by a high damage roll, for up to 12 points of damage. Which knocks out most level 1 characters.

Of course the early death of a key player can create some good narrative. But it also removes damage potential from the player's side, so makes the combat slower again. From a social point of view it is awkward having a player just sit there, not able to participate, just rolling death saves for the rest of the encounter. Especially if it is due to no fault of his own.

I guess that is a typical example of me putting gameplay over narrative. I would like the outcome of a combat to be determined by tactics, not by chance, even if that makes the game more predictable and less fast.
Tobold's Blog



My epic Wurm Online journey to retrieve my corpse
Posted by [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 5 July 2015, 1:16 pm
When you die in Wurm (I died when my character was attacked by some creatures and then drowned) you have to “respawn” and lose some items and some skill levels. I respawned back at the newbie area on Deliverance and ran back to my corpse. I filmed this while I did. It took over an … Continue reading My epic Wurm Online journey to retrieve my corpse


Great PR
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 8:57 am
Wherever you stand on the issue of the Greek referendum, you need to admire Greece for its great public relations: Everywhere the story is how the plucky Greeks said "no" to the evil European loan sharks that want to suck all the life out of Greece. Debt forgiveness is widely demanded.

Actually I am for debt forgiveness as well. I mean, there isn't much chance that Greece will ever pay back its loans and bailouts, so you might as well write the money off right away. But maybe even more importantly, it might change the narrative to be somewhat kinder to the rest of Europe: Because what Greece wants isn't simple debt forgiveness. They want fresh money, their debt forgiven in order to then be able to take out new loans. They want to continue living a lifestyle where the state spends far more money than its revenue. Yes, of course Greece's GDP would look a lot better with unlimited free money from elsewhere, but can you really blame the rest of Europe for not wanting to throw more money into that bottomless pit?

I think the rest of Europe should forgive the Greek debt, and then hold a referendum on whether to give the Greeks more money. I'd bet the people of Europe would vote "Oxi" to that. And for the Greeks it is a lot harder to walk around with signs saying "We demand your money!" instead of "No to austerity".
Tobold's Blog



The Daily Grind: What’s the most addictive collection minigame you’ve played?
Posted by Massively Overpowered [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 8:00 am
I’ve been playing a lot of Assassin’s Creed: Rogue here lately, and while it’s certainly no MMO, it has managed to remind me of the MMO space’s more addictive mechanics courtesy of its collection minigames. I’ve spent far more time sailing around the North Atlantic (and the rooftops of colonial New York) looking for floating musical shanties and glowing animus [...]


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